• The History of Labor Day

    Labor Day

    Labor Day, which takes place on the first Monday of September every year, is a national holiday that celebrates workers in America. The history of Labor Day has roots in the labor movement of the 1800s, a movement that protested against the inhumane treatment of workers during the Industrial Revolution and helped win key rights for the American labor force.

    At the start of the Industrial Revolution, as early as the 1700s, laborers began protesting against the horrible conditions of factories and their long work hours. The labor movement grew more organized as the years went on, attempting to organize into unions, as well as rallying and holding strikes.

    A member of the labor movement proposed making Labor Day an official holiday in the early 1880s, though historians still debate whether Peter McGuire or Matthew McGuire was the first to propose it and when. Regardless, the first Labor Day celebration was held on September 5, 1882.

    Workers organized to hold another Labor Day celebration on the same day in 1883, and in 1884 an official proposal was made for Labor Day to take place on the first Monday of every September. Labor Day was celebrated in 23 states before Congress passed a law in 1894 making it an official holiday nationwide.

    This Labor Day, kick back and relax — you’ve earned it! While you’re at it, treat yourself by stopping into College Chevrolet Buick and checking out our selection.

     

  • A Brief History of Labor Day

    Happy Labor Day
    Happy Labor Day from College Chevrolet Buick!

    Celebrated every year on the first Monday in September, Labor Day is known nowadays as the end of summer and the three-day weekend made for grill-outs. Some people may know that Labor Day was originally created to honor the contributions of workers, but many don’t know the in-depth history of Labor Day and its origins in the Industrial Revolution. In that era of our nation’s history, many people worked long hours in unregulated, hazardous conditions for very little pay.

    Labor Day was first proposed during a time when many workers were going on strike for unfair wages and wanted to be recognized for their value and efforts. The idea was first proposed by one of two men, though people disagree on which one it truly was—either Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor, or Matthew McGuire of the Central Labor Union. Either way, the proposal was made and adopted in 1882, the year the very first Labor Day parade was held in New York City.

    The holiday had difficulty working its way up to a national level. Originally, the idea of a “workingmens’ holiday” was honored in some state governments, but it wasn’t until 1892 that Congress solidified the history of Labor Day as a turning point in American history and uplifted it to the level of a national holiday.